Meet the Team!

Dr Sobana Wijeakumar (University of Nottingham)

[She/Her]

Dr. Wijeakumar is the Research Lead and Principal Investigator on Project NeuroSync. She is an Assistant Professor at the University of Nottingham and a Honorary Lecturer at the University of Stirling. Dr Wijeakumar’s research seeks to understand the developmental trajectory of visual working memory and inhibitory control across the lifespan – particularly in infancy and early childhood and older adults.

Click here to find out more about Dr. Wijeakumar’s research.

Dr Line Caes (University of Stirling)

[She/Her]

Dr. Caes is a co-investigator on Project NeuroSync. She is a lecturer at the University of Stirling . Dr. Caes’s research seeks to understand parent-child interactions in the context of typical and atypical child pain experiences.

Click here to find out more about Dr. Caes’s research.

Dr Christopher Madan (University of Nottingham)

[He/Him]

Dr. Madan is a collaborator on Project NeuroSync. He is also an Assistant Professor at the University of Nottingham. Dr. Madan’s research focuses on memory and brain imaging across the lifespan.

Click here to find out more about Dr. Madan’s research.

Prof. John Spencer (University of East Anglia)

[He/Him]

Prof. Spencer is a Consultant on Project NeuroSync. He is a Professor of Psychology at the University of East Anglia . Professor Spencer’s research seeks to examine the development of executive functions including working memory, attention, and inhibitory control.

Click here to find out more about Prof. Spencer’s research.

Christina Davidson (PhD Student, University of Nottingham)

[She/Her]

Christina’s research focus will examine how the mothers executive function and interactions influences their babies’ cognitive and behavioural development across the first few years of life.

Ghada Amaireh (PhD Student, University of Nottingham)

[She/Her]

Ghada’s research focus will examine how mothers’ daily executive function abilities is linked to socio-emotional and brain-to-brain synchrony during interactions they have with their babies.

Aimee Theyer (PhD Student, University of Nottingham)

[She/Her]

Aimee’s research focus will examine how babies’ visual working memory function is impacted by explorative looking behaviour, socio-emotional synchrony and brain-to-brain synchrony during interactions between mothers and babies during the first few years of life.